Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Snoopy's Reunion

Charles M. Schulz, the creator of the popular comic strip, Peanuts was simply put, a literary genius. I can think of few artists who had the impact of Schulz. The television specials of Charlie Brown, Lucy, Snoopy and the rest of the gang are legendary. From the Great Pumpkin to the Christmas Story, most of us have lived and grown up watching the enduring stories of Charlie Brown. Thankfully a long time favorite Snoopy’s Reunion, along with special features including Flashbeagle and a documentary of the original voices of Charlie Brown make a wonderful package in a newly mastered DVD. I was anxious to watch the DVD, and found myself enjoying not only these older stories, but especially the documentary of the original cast members’ reunion at Com Con.

The remastered version of this DVD is exceptional and while the older animation styles may not blow everyone away, the originality of story will keep each fan of Peanuts happy. One of the benefits of the extra features is the discovery of the techniques used by Schulz and legendary director Bill Melendez. The ability to find and direct children in the original roles was genius. Despite originally being told that the use of non actor children wouldn’t work, Melendez and Schulz understood the importance of portraying the innocence of children. It was in their portrayal of the innocence of children that we all discovered something about the truths evident in life, not just for children, but adults through the stories of Charlie Brown and his friends.

In the stories presented on the DVD we have an exploration of Snoopy. We find out about this self-centered, yet, loving little beagle, from his past to the importance of being himself. In many ways we see our own stories, our own struggles and that is a part of the beauty of the characters created by Schulz. We all try to be something we aren’t at times, and it is when we find ourselves that we find our ability to be effective.

Snoopy goes through the struggles of losing family, and yet through those struggles also finding out what is really important to him. He like many of us has to find himself and the struggle of finding oneself is one that can be a lifelong challenge. The simple conclusions that Snoopy, and the other characters come to are a part of the beauty of these stories. It is in trying to be like others that we often lose sight of who we really are. It isn’t in becoming like others that we find our meaning, it is in finding ourselves. It is amazing at what a little beagle, names Snoopy can teach us in those regards.

Charles Schulz was a deeply spiritual man, especially so in his earlier years. He approached faith from a realistic and often times humanistic perspective. He openly admitted using the themes of his faith in his characters and in his stories. Many of those simple themes of love of family, respect for authority, and others are addressed here as well as through the characters of Snoopy and his family.

I enjoyed this DVD. Surprisingly, my favorite part of the DVD wasn’t so much the stories but the documentary that explored the lives and attitudes of the original characters who portrayed the voices of Charlie Brown on the television shows. Getting to see the faces behind the characters was a rarity that I had personally not experienced. Don’t get me wrong, the background stories of Snoopy were entertaining and enjoyable, but my favorite part of Peanuts was always Charlie Brown. Snoopy was a character that I didn’t find as enjoyable due to his lack of humility. The background of how he came to be Charlie Brown’s dog was enjoyable and actually quite entertaining.

At regular purchase prices, this DVD may be a little disappointing for some unless they are a pure fan of the comic strip. It is short in duration and don’t really fit the criteria for me for ownership due to the lack of time and special features. Yet it would be a very worthwhile rental. If you have fans of the comic in your family, or if you want to teach the importance of family to your children, this could be a video worth owning. That value of family is an attribute well worth teaching to. This video could compliment this concept, and the simplicity of story used by Charles Schulz is well done. We don’t always need complicated story to teach important lessons. Schulz understood that, and I for one am grateful for his contribution.

The following is a video clip from the DVD, just click on the video, if the video don't appear, just click on the following link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fq7oDiWkuUg


The following features the other feature on the DVD, Flashbeagle. A long-time fan favorite.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mO6ccX90HNI




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Now for those that do not know, make sure you check out the numerous articles and blogs by checking out the archives. If visiting The Virtual Pew or MySpace they are archived on the left hand side of the page. Scroll down to where you see newer or older listed under archives and then click there. There are hundreds of postings so make sure to check out the archives. You can also contact me for a free e-book pre edit version of The Keystone Kid at mike@thevirtualpew.comYou can visit http://www.thevirtualpew.com/ and on the front page down on the left side you sill see our store. Your purchase provides needed funds to The Virtual Pew. If you do not see something to purchase you can click on the search engine, (do not put anything in the search box at this time). You will be taken to Amazon where you can search for anything you desire. Hopefully you will consider a gift to The Virtual Pew.

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Friday, April 17, 2009

An Interview with Christian Music Legend Pat Terry

I recently reviewed the album, Laugh for a Million Years recorded by Pat Terry. Pat is one of the pioneers of Christian music, but he may be better known in the non Christian world for the songs he has written. I had the opportunity to ask Pat a few questions and what follows is that interview in its entirety, without edit. Pat says some incredible things here, things I have personally heard some of those early pioneers of the so called “Christian Music” genera communicate before. Read, enjoy, and think about the things Pat shares here, there is a lot to learn from our past and those that paved the path, we could hear from few who knows as much about this as Pat Terry.

MF: Laugh For A Million Years sounds a lot like it was written for Mark Heard. Can you tell us about this song?

PT: "Laugh For A Million Years" was written not long after Mark died, and I performed it at his memorial service in Nashville. It's my tribute to him, and to everyone who dreams big.

MF: Can you say anything about the dedication to Mark and Randy?

PT: As for my album's dedication, I don't really have much to add. I hope the dedication will speak for itself. Both Mark and Randy encouraged me greatly, and indeed Randy was quite insistent over the years that I do this album. They were such wonderful friends and are greatly missed.

MF: You were always known for your writing from both a musical and lyrical perspective. How do you marry the two concepts?

PT: By definition songs are marriages of music and lyrics, so it’s something I think about a lot. The process of writing songs is such an interesting thing to me. Sometimes it feels like it’s something that’s going on outside yourself, and you’re just kind of an antenna, picking it up and writing it down. And other times it’s a struggle, where you’re wrestling an idea to the ground. I used to write very quickly and didn’t do a lot of re-writing or editing of lyrics. But as time has gone on, I’ve discovered that if you give a song a little time, get away from it for a while, and then come back, you’ll often find areas that are close but not quite right. Maybe it’s just a word that’s throwing things off, or maybe one or two lines that seem slightly disconnected. If you hang in there with it, and don’t rush it, you’ll often get something better and more real. With that in mind, fine-tuning a lyric is something I spend a lot of time on these days. Interestingly enough, I’ve learned that it’s usually more important what I take out of a lyric than what I put in.

MF: You are one of the originals in the CCM market, it has changed quite a bit since the 1970’s, what are your thoughts on the music then and now?

PT: Well, I haven’t worked much at all in Christian Music since 1984 when I released my last album for Myrrh records, so I’m not intimately acquainted with a lot of what’s gone on since that time. But back in the early seventies, I can tell you that most of us who were beginning to make records for Christian labels weren’t thinking about music in terms of a market. We were just writing from the overflow of a newfound Christian experience, and I think you hear that in the music. It was heartfelt and fresh, and it had kind of a hippie, counter-cultural attitude too, that certainly wasn’t anti-church, but it was shaking up conventional ideas about church so it felt a bit radical. We had just come out of the sixties, so for music to have a bit of that radical edge to it was nothing too unusual. It was the fact that it was Christian young people making these records and listening to them that was so different. Eventually though, the labels started marketing campaigns that targeted primarily Christians, and pretty soon this music that seemed so alternative just became the new gospel music. From what I can see that’s pretty much what CCM music is today. I can appreciate some of that, and I actually like some traditional gospel music a lot, but I’m one who believes that musicians with a personal faith shouldn’t feel like church oriented music is the only avenue worth taking.

I’m really impressed by the number of younger artists these days who don’t connect themselves with the CCM industry side of things, but whose faith is informing their work. They’re avoiding a lot of the stereotypes that have been an uphill battle for a lot of Christian artists, and are being taken more seriously artistically, which is great to see. I hope church leadership can see the value in this kind of expression and be supportive without insisting on owning it collectively, because the artists need the support of their church families, but they don’t need the added pressure of conforming to evangelical cultural standards that aren’t always helpful when it comes to developing artistically.

As a music fan, I wanna hear these people with real gifts do their thing, and for that to happen the artist has to be operating with a sense of freedom. Whatever is on his or her mind needs to come out. They can’t be worrying about whether it’s gonna sound like Christian radio, or whether it can be used as a lead-in for a sermon, or whatever. It just has to be what they care about, and A&R departments, or church ministers, or even audiences, can’t tell the artist what that is and what it’s supposed to sound like. Real artists have their own way of expressing themselves and it’s that uniqueness that usually cuts through all the mediocrity out there and connects. It’s rare to hear that in popular music these days, CCM or otherwise, but when you do it’s exciting.

MF: You have had some success writing material for other artists, especially those in the country market, are there any favorites or experiences you would be willing to share?

PT: It’s always exciting for me when someone records one of my songs, so it’s hard to choose a favorite. B.J. Thomas recorded “Home Where I Belong” way back in 1976, and it’s still one of my favorite covers. More recently, when John Anderson recorded “Jump On It”, it was especially fun because my wife and I wrote that song, so we were able to share the experience of seeing it go from our demo to John’s album. His version of that song is just so perfect, we couldn’t have been happier. And sometimes a song connects in a way that is beyond what you could’ve hoped for. Travis Tritt once told me that after his record of “Help Me Hold On” came out, he heard from a number of people who told him that song really helped them work through some difficult times in their marriage. I love that. Once a song is recorded and the artist takes it out there to his or her audience, it starts to have a life of its own, which is so great.

Really though, for me, most of the good experiences connected with my writing songs and specifically those that I wrote in Nashville over the last twenty years, are not so much related to how the songs got recorded, or even who recorded them, but in the actual writing process.

I’ve done a lot of co-writing in the songs I’ve written for country artists, and it’s that interaction with other writers that has been special for me. The first cut I got once I started spending time in Nashville was back in 1989. It was a song called “Lie To Yourself” that I wrote with Bill Lloyd, who back in those days was part of the country/rock duo “Foster & Lloyd”. They put that song on their second album, which was a great thrill for me, because I really loved what they were doing. But the best part of it was that Bill and I became fast friends during those days. He’s someone I really respect, not just because he’s an amazing talent, but he’s one of the most decent human beings you’ll ever meet. And even though he’s had a long and successful career, he still makes music for the love of it. That’s inspiring to me. Songwriting gave me that opportunity to make a great friend, and I’m glad to say that’s happened a lot. I wrote quite often with Randy Vanwarmer before he passed away back in 2004, and we really forged a great friendship through those writing sessions. I put two of our songs on my new CD. To be able to do that means more to me than any chart record.

MF: If Pat Terry had to pick out a movie, a book, and a CD or Record to have on a desert island for a year, what would they be?

PT: Movie: Duck Soup / The Marx Brothers - Because I’ve got a feeling laughing might be crucial to surviving on a desert island.

Book: The Lord Of The Rings / J.R.R. Tolkein - Because three volumes could probably be stretched out to last a year, and the fantasy aspect of it might help me forget I’m actually TRAPPED ON A DESERT ISLAND!

CD: 1 / The Beatles - This disc includes all the Beatles number one records, which only scratches the surface, but when you can only choose one CD, this'll work. People who know me understand my inability to choose anything else.

MF: Pat, in the early days, it seemed as if the church and many Christians didn’t accept the direction of the “New Contemporary Christian Songs.” There were struggles you and many others went through. Many bands and Christians today seem to be ignorant of their history and the struggles. What would you tell the Christians out there doing music today is the most important lesson you learned over the years that would be of benefit today?

PT: That’s a hard question to answer, because frankly I have a lot of mixed feelings about what came out of the things we did back in those early days. Is what we got what we really wanted? Despite the number of people who’ve responded positively to what became known as Contemporary Christian Music, there’s also the reality that as the music became more and more popular, the commercial aspects of the music business forever colored not only the music itself, but the churches that have embraced it. I get the impression that some of these congregations actually believe that the hipper and more technically advanced the presentation, the greater the potential for the working of the Holy Spirit, and I just can’t see it. It makes me sad actually. Of course, I understand, there’s something to be said for each generation reaching out to it’s own in a language that is culturally relevant, so in and of itself, it’s not wrong to want to speak in a contemporary way. But with so much emphasis on that in today’s evangelical church, I fear that what’s been created is a Christian culture that’s mastering the technical aspects of the presentation, without having much of a feel for what they’re actually communicating. Sometimes all this technicality just becomes the message, and in itself can distract people from really having an encounter with God. The concept of a “seeker service”, which seems to be what a lot of this kind of presentation is about, is interesting, but when does it cross the line from being valid communication to being manipulation? That’s what I think about. Musicians serving in that kind of atmosphere have a unique challenge, I think. And for those in the pew, who come to church needing a more intimate worship experience, I wonder if they can find it there. If I want to be wowed by hi-def video screens or hear thousands of watts of crystal clear concert sound, then I can get that at home or at an arena somewhere at a rock and roll show. In church, I want to feel that human connection and I want to get away from all the frantic bombardment of the media that we live with on a daily basis, and get quiet before God. You can be drowning in the midst of all the lights and cameras, and barely realize it’s happening until suddenly you’re gasping for air and going under. That’s why personally, I’ve come to appreciate a more liturgical form of worship. Maybe it’s not for everyone, but for someone like me, who on and off has been in and out of the mix of all this contemporary kind of christian music through the years, liturgical worship has been a spiritual lifesaver, so to speak. I suppose that’s what I’d pass along to my younger musician friends… Bigger is not always better. God still speaks in a still, small voice.

MF: While I can't find any videos of Pat, I can find a couple of the songs he stated was among his favorites covered by other artists. I am including the BJ Thomas cover of Home Where I Belong. Just double click on the video, if the video doesn't appear, just click on the link.

BJ Thomas: Home Where I belong
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0wQgx98jmZQ



Click Here to Go to The Virtual Pew Daily Verse and Read The Bible in a Year Passages

Click here for booking information to have Pastor Mike come speak or perform, from speaking to music or magic, something for all groups.

Click to visit with Pastor Mike regarding any of your needs. He will respond to each request personally, and if need be refer you to one of our other pastors.

Click to visit and join the new group The Virtual Pew, at MySpace. Become a part of a different kind of Christian group, check out the page for more information,all welcome, including those who are not followers of Jesus.

Click to visit the Virtual Pew Website and become a part of that ministry.

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Now for those that do not know, make sure you check out the numerous articles and blogs by checking out the archives. If visiting The Virtual Pew or MySpace they are archived on the left hand side of the page. Scroll down to where you see newer or older listed under archives and then click there. There are hundreds of postings so make sure to check out the archives. You can also contact me for a free e-book pre edit version of The Keystone Kid at mike@thevirtualpew.comYou can visit http://www.thevirtualpew.com/ and on the front page down on the left side you sill see our store. Your purchase provides needed funds to The Virtual Pew. If you do not see something to purchase you can click on the search engine, (do not put anything in the search box at this time). You will be taken to Amazon where you can search for anything you desire. Hopefully you will consider a gift to The Virtual Pew.

Now I get asked this quite often, Can we repost your blogs or articles? The short answer to that is, what an honor that you would ask, and by all means, spread the word.Here is our contact information

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P.O. Box 17731
Wichita, KS 67217

Click on the following links to learn more about The Virtual Pew

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Friday, April 3, 2009

Pat Terry, Laugh for a Million Years

Pat Terry
Laugh for a Million Years
Horse and Sandwich Productions
http://www.patterryonline.com/
www.myspace.com/therealpatterry

Let’s just get it out on the table to start with. “Christian Music, as a general rule of thumb, SUCKS!” Whew, I just got that off of my chest, but as a long time Charter Member of the “Classic Christian Music Club,” I have paid my dues, I have earned the right to say that. I started working in Christian Music shortly after my salvation in the mid 1970’s. I promoted my first Christian Music Festival in 1978; I started working in Christian music full-time in 1983, and up until that point, had been doing reviews, promoting concerts, managing bands and much more. I worked hard in this industry; some say I was the first to put Christian bands into non Christian venues successfully. I take honor in knowing that in 1988, one of the bands I managed and worked for, The Rob Cassels Band, (AKA Rob Castles) was according to Poll-Star and Performance Magazines as the top grossing band in North America in theaters 2,500 and under, (Blue Oyster Cult was #2 and The Judd’s was #3 in that particular year.) NCM Services, the agency I managed was named as the top new agency in North America by one publication and one of the top 10 new agencies in North America in another. This not from Christian publications, but popular non Christian publications that had a dramatic impact on the industry.

Now don’t get me wrong, to say that Christian Music sucked is a general rule of thumb, not a blanket statement that included all bands, in fact, many of the early pioneers were, and continued to maintain their integrity, not just as musicians, but as people living in the real world, and living a real life. Pat Terry was among those original Christian Artists that was laced with quality through and through.

Pat Terry started out with The Pat Terry Group, one of my favorite early Christian Folk Rock Bands. Pat as it seems hadn’t been around much over the last 20+ years or so, that is unless you consider some of his work with people like Travis Tritt, Tanya Tucker, Confederate Railroad, John Anderson, Kenny Chesney, Alan Jackson, and the list could go on and on. The fact is, Pat Terry had inspired many contemporary legends with his songs, and with his talent. It was some years ago when watching him and his band at a concert in Upper East Tennessee that I learned to appreciate the man whose music I listened to so much on the vinyl records of the day.

A few years later I got to know one of the people Pat dedicates his new CD to, Mark Heard. Mark was another filled with quality, and to know that Pat would dedicate his first project in almost 25 years would have made him proud. Mark was one of the top song writers of all time and it is obvious when you listen to Laugh for a Million Years that these two could have been considered brothers.

I have longed for a brand new day in the world of Christians involved in music, a day where the quality and talent would shine through. Pat Terry with Laugh for a Million Years starts off in an appropriate way with a wonderful acoustic tune titled, Brand New Day. This wonderful Americana style song starts off with a riveting mandolin rift and is somewhat autobiographical. The song in a wonderful way can be listened to by the old Pat Terry fans in a way that causes them to reflect on not only the life of one like Pat, but those who enjoyed this era, and meaning seemingly lost by a new generation of musicians focused more on business than they are on meaningful songs that can touch the soul.

Laugh For A Million Years is a song that features a talented song writer. This song as many other songs on this CD will remind you of the importance of quality song writers. While this country styled song reminded me of how many in life progress and how if we aren’t careful we lose those relationships and friends. While the song addresses life, it is also filled with hope of eternity. Laugh For A Million Years is a fitting tribute to long-time friend Mark Heard.

Outrun the Wind is a simple ballad with some really nice mandolin work laced with some wonderful viola. This song reminds me a lot of the style of Mark Heard. It not only shows some quality musicianship and ability, but giftedness in the delivery of a lyric. This song, co written by Pat Terry and the late Randy Vanwarmer shows the talent of these two men. In many ways, this song is like a prayer, but not the kind we hear in church, the kind said from a sincere heart filled only with the wisdom that comes with years of life. The song beautifully illustrates the marriage that can take place between the lyric and music.

Open Windows is a song that features some really sweet production that brings out the guitar chording and keyboard/piano work. I really appreciated the crisp drum sounds on this song. Open Windows is another ballad that has a country feel to it. The song illustrates struggles and faith. It can be a reminder to all of us of the need to keep on hoping, and believing.

Jump On It is one of the first kicking tunes on the album. The tempo picks up and we can hear the versatility of Pat Terry that has existed for a number of years. The song reminded me of the new country that is out there, somewhat similar to the styles of such artists as Craig Morgan. This life affirming song drives home the importance of family. This song features some nice steel and slide guitar along with some fun piano work.

Someplace Green starts out with some nice acoustic guitar work. This allegorical song caused me to think about the complications of life. It is a reflective song using color as a metaphor. This song is really an exploration of hope. It is beautifully written and although a simple song musically, it illustrates the importance of the lyric.

If Jesus Was Like Me is one of my favorite songs on this album. This reflective song is a thoughtful exploration of who we are in comparison to Jesus Christ. In reality we can all find faults in our actions. The song builds and has a strong country feel. It seems as if Christians often have a ton of focus on themselves, yet If Jesus Was Like Me illustrates more so the accomplishments of Jesus and where we would be if we were in fact more like Jesus.

Yearning to Live starts out with some really nice guitar work. While some often reflect on the complications of the guitar, they often forget about how to play the instrument with feeling. This song illustrates the importance of using the instrument to express feeling. The song is an exploration of suicidal thoughts and the reality of a desire to live. Yearning to live builds very nicely with some nicely mixed mandolin work. The production quality is appreciated from the driving influences to the use of well crafted and mixed in supporting vocals. This song is a triumph of the spirit not just in the message content, but for those seeking hope.

The Gift of Mercy is a ballad that reminds me of an old movie by William A. Wellman titled Heroes For Sale. It is a story of tough times and bad decisions. The song understands that even though one may not be as bad as they perceive themselves to be, they still have the need for mercy and it is ultimately mercy that will be the salvation of us all. Even bad people have access to mercy. This soft ballad reminded me of some of the top Americana Artists out there, artists who have a story to tell. I love the lyrical allegory here, lines such as “Love is like a candle, blazing in the wind.” Like most of the other songs, Pat Terry is trying to get us to think, not just about the stories we hear, but the stories we have experienced.

Rivers of Hope is another song driven by lyrical content. For those who are fans of the old Pat Terry Group, you will love the harmonizing vocals here. It is extremely well crafted and understands how to get an emphasis across. Pat Terry understands the difference between religion and faith or a deep rooted spirituality. This song illustrates that difference. It illustrates how we forget to practice the things we know, things like making sure we spend time with our creator. This song helps illustrate why it is Pat Terry is so well respected among popular performers which seem to have latched on to so many of his songs. This is a song that could achieve commercial success if given the chance, but that could be said about many other songs here.

The first time I heard the song Forgiveness I was deeply moved. I had just returned from a trip to Tennessee where I had to offer forgiveness and love to a person who had sinned against me some 35 years ago. This was a sin that will impact my entire life but one I knew I had to forgive the person for because I didn’t want to be held captive to their sin. I don’t know what has happened in the life of Pat Terry to write such inspiring words, but there is an understanding on forgiveness that I have seldom heard. There are beautiful songs, memorable songs, but then there are songs that can change a life if applied. In many ways, this isn’t just a song; it is a sermon that can change lives. Forgiveness is a fitting end to a wonderful, enjoyable CD that grows and grows with each listen.

It has been far too long since Pat Terry did an album. I can only hope it isn’t as long before we hear from him again. This is an album that not only fans of Pat Terry will want, but any fan of Americana music will want. Pat Terry has had a lasting impact on the world of music, not only as one of the first Christians to popularize the style known today as Contemporary Christian Music, but as a writer who has had his songs recorded by many of the top artists in the world of Country Music. He is a musician’s musician, and a song writer’s writer. You simply can’t go wrong with this wonderful album. It is possible that Pat Terry may be the best song writer alive. In an age when Christians seem to forget about the quality God expects, it is nice to know that a few still produce quality, quality that can be appreciated not just by people who are like minded, but by anyone who enjoys a good song and a well crafted lyric.

Now coming soon will be my interview with Pat. Until then, check out the following link where you can go and listen to some of Pat's new music. www.myspace.com/therealpatterry

The following is a dedication photo to old friend Mark Heard, one of the people this CD is dedicated to.

Click Here to Go to The Virtual Pew Daily Verse and Read The Bible in a Year Passages

Click here for booking information to have Pastor Mike come speak or perform, from speaking to music or magic, something for all groups.

Click to visit with Pastor Mike regarding any of your needs. He will respond to each request personally, and if need be refer you to one of our other pastors.

Click to visit and join the new group The Virtual Pew, at MySpace. Become a part of a different kind of Christian group, check out the page for more information,all welcome, including those who are not followers of Jesus.

Click to visit the Virtual Pew Website and become a part of that ministry.

Click to subscribe to my blog

Click to visit and join our sister group at MySpace Hollywood Jesus.

Click to visit Mary Jane Furches' new MySpace Page

Now for those that do not know, make sure you check out the numerous articles and blogs by checking out the archives. If visiting The Virtual Pew or MySpace they are archived on the left hand side of the page. Scroll down to where you see newer or older listed under archives and then click there. There are hundreds of postings so make sure to check out the archives. You can also contact me for a free e-book pre edit version of The Keystone Kid at mike@thevirtualpew.comYou can visit http://www.thevirtualpew.com/ and on the front page down on the left side you sill see our store. Your purchase provides needed funds to The Virtual Pew. If you do not see something to purchase you can click on the search engine, (do not put anything in the search box at this time). You will be taken to Amazon where you can search for anything you desire. Hopefully you will consider a gift to The Virtual Pew.

Now I get asked this quite often, Can we repost your blogs or articles? The short answer to that is, what an honor that you would ask, and by all means, spread the word.Here is our contact information

The Virtual Pew
P.O. Box 17731
Wichita, KS 67217

Click on the following links to learn more about The Virtual Pew

Donations to The Virtual Pew

http://www.furches.org/donations/index.html

The Virtual Pew

The Virtual Pew Blog

Personal Furches Web Site

Mary Jane Furches MySpace Page

Mike Furches MySpace Page

Mike Furches MySpace Blog

Hollywood Jesus

Reviews With Mike

The Virtual Pew Sermons

The Virtual Pew News

MySpace Hollywood Jesus Group

MySpace The Virtual Pew Group

The Virtual Pew Live Radio Web Page

To Subscribe to The Virtual Pew Live Feed

Phone Number to Call During The Virtual Pew Live Show, (Please never call prior to the start of the show) - (646) 716-8587

Phone Number to Call During The HJ Live Show, (Please never call prior to the start of the show) - (646) 716-8853

To Subscribe to The Virtual Pew Live Feed -http://www.blogtalkradio.com/feeds/thevirtualpew

To Subscribe to HJ Live Live Feed –http://www.blogtalkradio.com/feeds/hollywoodjesus